You don’t know, you know

Reading on from the First Round Review newsletter today (thanks for that tip, Dan), I clicked on a link about imposter syndrome. Dr Emily Anhalt notes: “Most people with competence have some Imposter Syndrome, because they know how much they don’t know. It’s the opposite of the Dunning-Kruger effect.” Competent people know how much they don’t know. If you’re feeling inadequate, remember you’re merely conscious … Continue reading You don’t know, you know

Clutching at stories

I’m reading ‘Lost Connection’ by Johann Hari again. It tells a powerful story about the impact of pharmaceutical company profiteering on how depression is treated. Regardless of whether or not he’s right about that, there’s a clear acknowledgment of the placebo effect in the medical profession. Placebos work because of the stories (which may be implicit) we absorb about them. For good or bad, humans … Continue reading Clutching at stories

Doing something amazing

I’m giving blood shortly. I last gave blood not long after lockdown started – it’s considered essential, and with good reason. The process is trickier with a pandemic going on, but it’s still happening because of the outstanding work of people (including volunteers) who find a way to make things happen. It’s a reminder that there are lots of ways to contribute. There’s no one-size-fits-all … Continue reading Doing something amazing

Look carefully

I’ve hugely enjoyed reading ‘The War of Art’ by Steven Pressfield. He talks about Resistance (yep, with a capital ‘R’) and how it impacts what we contribute. His book is pretty pared down to begin with and while he offers different perspectives on almost the same thing across the pages, it’s that rounded view that builds to such a powerful and, for me, revelatory message. … Continue reading Look carefully

It may, it will, get better

This will pass, things will get better. It’s a common reassurance given to people experiencing hardship. It’s well intended, but to me it feels a little hollow. There’s no guarantee and so we cannot merely hold on and hope, confident that better will arrive soon enough. But, things definitely CAN get better. Hope is a key part of that happening. Optimism isn’t a failure to … Continue reading It may, it will, get better

Resilience

A concise summary of three strategies for resilience, which are more eloquently put forward in Lucy Hone’s TEDx talk. Bad things happen, so expect to have to deal with them. Place your attention carefully, don’t dwell on the bad things. Whatever you’re doing to cope, ask yourself if it’s harmful or helpful. Not easy, but straight-forward. All related to our sphere of control. We always … Continue reading Resilience

Possibility likes space

Around the middle of July I face professional uncertainty. Engagement with my current employer comes to an end and although there’s scope to do more work, it’s distinctly possible I’ll need to find something new. I don’t have a cushion or a fall-back position that I can rest easily with. This is a trivial concern compared to the challenges some are facing, but it’s still … Continue reading Possibility likes space

Responsibility

I can’t remember where I read it now, but I made half a note at the time as I liked the thought: Responsibility. Formally bestowed, or informally shouldered. Some of our formal leaders are clearly failing. Other, greater, leaders have no authority vested in them – they’re just stepping up and moving us forward. We can all make a difference. . (Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash) Continue reading Responsibility