You don’t know, you know

Reading on from the First Round Review newsletter today (thanks for that tip, Dan), I clicked on a link about imposter syndrome. Dr Emily Anhalt notes: “Most people with competence have some Imposter Syndrome, because they know how much they don’t know. It’s the opposite of the Dunning-Kruger effect.” Competent people know how much they don’t know. If you’re feeling inadequate, remember you’re merely conscious … Continue reading You don’t know, you know

Clutching at stories

I’m reading ‘Lost Connection’ by Johann Hari again. It tells a powerful story about the impact of pharmaceutical company profiteering on how depression is treated. Regardless of whether or not he’s right about that, there’s a clear acknowledgment of the placebo effect in the medical profession. Placebos work because of the stories (which may be implicit) we absorb about them. For good or bad, humans … Continue reading Clutching at stories

Bringing medicine up to date

I’m delighted to have read that the University of Bristol Medical School are making changes to their medical training, to better prepare students to diagnose and treat the multi-ethnic population in UK. Progress is being made. It’s important to recognise that, even as there remains so much to be done. Progress is being made. Keep going. . (Photo by National Cancer Institute on Unsplash) Continue reading Bringing medicine up to date

Ridgeway Ramble Write Up – part three: into extra time

Nearly 14 hours in and half the distance done, or thereabouts. It was properly dark at 2am, and the weather is turning a little earlier than expected. On with the show! Trotting along the River Thames by the moonlight was peaceful for a while, until the clouds rolled in and it started drizzling. Although no longer peaceful, the drizzle was quite nice and refreshing actually, … Continue reading Ridgeway Ramble Write Up – part three: into extra time